Feast TV: Brazilian-Style Acarajé with Vatapá (Bean Fritters Stuffed with Shrimp Paste)

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Get in the kitchen with Feast Tv host Cat Neville and understand how to make Brazilian-Design acarajé, or bean fritters stuffed with shrimp paste.


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15 Comments

  1. Crypto BR

    Interesting to see a total different and more lighter version of acarajé. Its my fav Brazilian snack. But in brazil we fry it in dende, which gives the authentic riches and vatapá which is more of a doughey paste of blend shrimp, brazil nuts, peanuts, dende oil and garlic and parsley and cylantro in the mixer. The salade is actualy on top which is made of chopped green tomatoes, red tomatoes and to finalize dried shrimp to add to the crunchiness together with the crunchy fritter. And we eat with the super spicy saus that most of North Americans would prefer not to have. Its burning hot. However I am glad to see acaraje internationalize. Its normal that every nation changes a bit the imported cuisine.

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  2. makini pitt

    where is the palm oil

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  3. M B

    Wow looks great. 👍🏼 x

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  4. Andréa Giudice

    This is not acarajé. I am from Salvador, Brazil and this is far from being original or even common to be eaten here. The main flavour of this dish(being an afro-Brazilian dish) is about the Dendê(palm oil) that we use to fry the bean paste. It's like make a tomatoe sauce only with carrot and keep calling it tomatoe sauce. And also I never heard of this kind of shrimp salad version, ever. The salad is always green tomatoes, coriander and onion with seasoning.. not fried or mixed with coconut cream and bread crumbs. I dont mean to be mean, it looks delicious, but its definitely not typical.

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  5. Gabriela Lins

    No, this is an ABSOLUTELY mess! This is minimally disrespectful! It’s cultural appropriation, this food is called ACARAJÉ and it’s not done properly, this is NOT BEAN FRITTERS!
    You could at least say the history behind it. It’s a religious food to us in Bahia! Please, next time you reproduce something be respectful at least to acknowledge what is not yours and respect people’s beliefs! This food it has spiritual value for us, we offer it to our Orisha oyá! Yes, it does sell on the street to tourists like you, but it comes from sacred houses, sacred religion and most of foremost it’s from our Orishas!
    To add, where’s the palm oil to do your “fritters?” And the vatapá to go with it? It does not have the same taste at all that I can guarantee! If you’re only getting inspired by it at least acknowledge that. Explain where you got your inspiration from! It’s a shame…

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  6. Naomi Meijer

    My partner is from Brazil; he and our friends said it would be impossible to make Acaraje.
    Thanks to your recipe we got a simplified version for us to try to make. However we replaced the oil for Brazilian Dende oil (Palm Oil) to get the authentic taste (I think this is an absolute must).
    But honestly, we are impressed!
    We will never be able to cook Acaraje and Vatapa like a real Baiana, but this was a good 'taste of home'.
    We enjoyed a lot, thanks!

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  7. Joselia Bomfim

    Oh linda, gostei da sua intenção de fazer o acarajé 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽 não é o autêntico Baiano, mas tá bom😃😃😃
    Mas pra vc fazer o verdadeiro, têm vários canais aqui no YouTube que ensinam o passo a passo,
    Canal Carinha Pirro
    Tiago Santiago
    Entre outros, 😘😘😘do Brasil 💖💝

    Reply
  8. Rick Farias

    with your art and knowledge, you were able to perfectly reproduce this delicacy of Brazilian culture. I tried your recipe and the taste is absolutely authentic, the best I had in years. thank you so much for sharing it with us. Best regards from Brazil 🇧🇷

    Reply
  9. lamoabird

    I would say this dish is loosely based on acarajé! I think I will find a different recipe for the vatapá. I’ve never made it before but ate it when I went to Bahia. To die for… Good try! Gave me a better idea how to make it here in Canada. Quem não tem cão caça com gato! Ty!

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  10. dorivalMp

    Thats not acarajé.

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  11. Sarah W

    No. Just, no. This isn't acarajé. The minimal cultural and historical information given here is inaccurate. This is…clueless american lady half ass researches a food she ate once in Brazil and then passes it off as if she is an expert at making it. This video is insulting.

    Reply
  12. Joseph Simko

    This looks delicious, but also a tremendous amount of work.

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  13. S K

    This is west African Akara

    Reply
  14. Matheus De Ferreira

    I know the difficulty of finding some acarajé ingredients in your country but there are a lot of things wrong with the recipe. I'm not happy

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  15. Aurora Souza Basso

    This has NOTHING to do with real Acarajé 😂

    Reply

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